36th VA Infantry

36th Virginia Infantry – Assignments & Engagements

The 36th Virginia Infantry’s first assignment was with the Army of the North West, later they served with the Army of the Kanawha. In early January 1862, the regiment was moved to Bowling Green, Ky. There they were placed in the Central Army of Kentucky. The regiment was one of the few regiments which managed to escape capture at Fort Donelson, Tn. in February 1862. They returned to Virginia, and soon served in the Valley District of the Department of Northern Virginia. In the spring of 1863, the regiment joined the Army of Western Virginia. They served until they merged with the Army of Western Virginia and Eastern Tennessee, until the beginning of 1864. In May 1864, they were attached to the Army of the Valley District (Stonewall Jackson’s old 2nd Corp.). The 36th Virginia served in this Army for the remainder of the war. The following list shows the specific command assignments of this regiment.

  • July 15,1861 – Assigned to General Wise’s Brigade, Army of the North West.
  •  August 13,1861 – Assigned to General Floyd’s Brigade, Army of the Kanawha.
  •  December 16,1861 – Assigned to General Johnson’s Army.
  •  January 31,1862 – . Assigned to General Floyd’s Brigade, Floyd’s Division, Central Army of Kentucky.
  •  April 9,1862 – Assigned to General Heth’s command.
  •  July 3,1862 –  Garrison duty, Monroe County Virginia. Valley District, Department of North West Virginia.
  •  September 9,1862 –  Assigned to General J.S. Wilbond’s command.
  •  November 22,1862 –  Unattached, Valley District, Department of Northern Virginia.
  •  October 31,1863 –  Assigned to the 4th Brigade, Army of Western Virginia.
  •  December 31,1863 –  Assigned to the 4th Brigade, Army of Western Virginia and Tennessee.
  •  May 1864 –  Assigned to General Breckenridge’s command.
  •  June 17,1864 –  Assigned to General Early’s command, Army of the Valley District.
  •  September 24,1864 –  Assigned to Wharton’s command.
  •  October 31,1864 –  Smith’s Brigade, Wharton’s Division, Army of the Valley District.

The 36th Virginia Infantry Regiment participated in 12 engagements in 1861, 14 engagements in 1862, only 2 in 1863, and over 85 engagements in 1864, and 3 in 1865. To the left are a brief list of engagements.

The 36th Virginia Infantry disbanded on April 12,1865 in Christainsburg, Virginia after hearing news of General Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, Virginia. Before the men separated and headed for home, they were given a review of there four years of service, recalling their victories and remembering those who were no longer with them.

The 36th Virginia Infantry had over 2300 men that served in her ranks between 1861-1865. (a regt. had 10 companies, each company had 100 men = 1000 men per regiment). They took over 50% casualties. 100 men died as result of battle. 150 men died from disease, another 625 men were captured. Of those men captured, 85 of them died in Federal prisons. About 250 men were severally wounded. Several hundred soldiers were transferred to other regt’s when the regiment was reorganized in August of 1861 and again in May 1862.

  •  Scary Creek, Scarytown, Va. – July 17,1861
  •  Cross Lanes, Va. – August 26,1861
  •  Carnifex Ferry, Va. – September 19,1861
  •  Fort Donelson, Tn. – February 14-16,1862
  •  Giles Court House, Va. – May 10,1862
  •  Fayetteville, Va. – September 10,1862
  •  Cotton Hill, Va. – September 11,1862
  •  Buffalo, Va. – October 1,1862
  •  Fayetteville, Va. – May 18-20,1863
  •  Fayetteville, Va. – June 3,1863
  •  Cloyd’s Mt., Va. – May 9,1864
  •  Piedmont, Va. – June 5,1864
  •  Lynchburg, Va. – June 17-18,1864
  •  Monocracy, Md. – July 9,1864
  •  Fort Stevens, Washington, DC – July 11-12, 1864
  •  Snickers’ Gap, Va. – July 17,1864
  •  Berryville, Va. – July 19,1864
  •  Stephens Depot, Va. – July 20,1864
  •  Fishers Hill, Va. – July 23,1864
  •  Winchester, Va. – August 10,1864
  •  Winchester, Va. – August 17-19,1864
  •  Opequon Creek, Va. – September 19,1864
  •  Fishers Hill, Va. – September 22,1864
  •  Cedar Creek, Va. – October 19,1864
  •  Fishers Hill, Va. – December 19,1864
  •  Waynesboro, Va. – March 2,1865

36th Virginia Infantry – Companies

Company A – Nicknamed the “BUFFALO GUARDS” ; Organized on November 1,1859 as a independent Militia company, assigned to this regiment for a one year enlistment on May 13,1861, accepted into C.S. service in July 1861. (This company was first known as part of the 3rd Kanawha Infantry Regt., which was disbanded in July 1861).

Company B (1st) – Nicknamed the “LOGAN COUNTY WILDCATS” ; Organized on May 27,1861, for a one year enlistment; accepted into C.S service July 1,1861. (This company was first known as part of the 2nd Kanawha Infantry Regt.) On May 26,1862 this company was reorganized, and consolidated with Companies C (1st) and H (1st) to form Company D (2nd).

Company B (2nd) – Nicknamed the “BOONE RANGERS” ; Organized and enlisted June 1,1861, for one year service: Accepted into C.S service on July 1,1861. (This company was first known as part of the 2nd Knanwha Infantry Regt.) Re-organized on May 26,1862 from company D(1st).

Company C (1st) – Nicknamed the “CHAPMANVILLE RIFLEMEN” ; Organized on June 19,1861, for one year enlistment: Accepted in C.S service July 1,1861. (This company was first known as part of the 2nd Kanawha Infantry Regt.) Consolidated with Company B (1st) and Company H (1st), to form Company D (2nd) on May 26,1862.

Company C (2nd) – Nicknamed the “RALEIGH RANGERS” ; Organized on June 3,1861, for a one year enlistment. Accepted into C.S service on July 1,1861; as Company E (1st). (This company was first known as part of the 2nd Kanawha Infantry Regt.). This Company was reorganized on May 12, 1862.

Company D (1st) – Nicknamed the “BOONE RANGERS” ; Organized on June 1,1861. This company was reorganized as company B(2nd), See Company B(2nd).

Company D (2nd) – Nicknamed the “LOGAN COUNTY WILDCATS”; formed May 26,1862 by the consolidation of Company B (1st) and H (1st) of this regiment ; some members transferred to Co. K (2nd) of this regiment on April 17,1864.

Company E (1st) – See Company C (2nd).

Company E (2nd) – Nicknamed the “WESTERN RIFLEMEN” : Formerly as Company G (1st), organized and enlisted on June 16,1861, for one year. Accepted into C.S service on July 1,1861. (This company was first part of the 3rd Kanawha Infantry Regt., which was broken up in July 1861); Company reorganized on May 13,1862.

Company F – Nicknamed the “MOUNTAIN RIFLEMEN” : Organized and enlisted on June 10,1861, for one year. (This company was first part of the 2nd Kanwaha Infantry Regt.) Company was Reorganized on May 13,1862.

Company G (1st) – See Company E (1st).

Company G (2nd) – Captain Henry C. Grossclose’s Company. Organized and enlisted on May 3,1862, for the duration of the war..

Company H (1st) – Captain Louis Lechenet’s Company: Organized and enlisted July 3,1861, for one year. Accepted into C.S service on July 11, 1861. Consolidated with Company B (1st) and C (1st) to form Company D (2nd) on May 26,1862.

Company H (2nd) – Captain Andrew J. Porterfield’s Company ; Organized and enlisted on April 13, 1862, for the duration of the war.

Company I (1st) – Captain John Rigg’s Company ; disbanded in August 1861.

Company I (2nd) – Captain John R. Dunlap’s Company ; Organized and enlisted on August 5, 1861, for one year. Accepted into C.S service on Sept.20,1861. Transferred out of the regiment. Assigned as Company B, 23rd Virginia Battalion Infantry on January 15,1862.

Company I (3rd) – Captain Andrew Gott’s Company ; Organized on April 16,1862, for the duration of the war. Enlisted on April 19,1862.

Company K (1st) – Nicknamed the “FAIRVIEW RIFLE GUARDS” ; Commanded by Captain James Corn’s ; Organized on May 28,1861. Disbanded in August 9th,1861.

Company K (2nd) – Captain Peter D. Morgan’s Company ; Organized on April 17,1864, composed from new recruits, conscripts and transfers from Company D (2nd).
Captain Albert J. Beckett’s Cavalry Company – Nicknamed the “BORDER GUARDS” ; Enlisted on May 16,1861, for one year from April 25,1861, and reported as a Cavalry Company in the 2nd Kanawha Infantry Regt.; In August 1861, this company reported as a cavalry company attached to this regiment. Transferred out of the regiment by order of General Floyd, on September 26,1861.

Captain Albert Jenkins’ Cavalry Company – Organized as a independent company on May 29,1861. This company was transferred out of this regiment by order of General Floyd, on August 4,1861. Later assigned to the 8th Virginia Cavalry, Company E.

Captain Robert A. Bailey’s Company – Organized and enlisted on June 6,1861, for one year. (This company was first known as part of the 2nd Kanawha Infantry Regt.) Transferred out of this regiment on August 31,1861. Assigned as Company K (3rd), 22nd Virginia Infantry, previously known as Company C, 22nd Virginia Infantry Regiment. (Perviously known as the 1st Kanawha Infantry Regt).

Captain William H. Lipscomb’s Company – Organized and enlisted on June 1,1861, for one year service. Reported in July 1861 as a incomplete company in the 3rd Kanwha Infantry Regt.) In early August 1861, as of this regiment: Transferred out of this regiment on August 31,1861. Assigned as Company B, 22nd Virginia Infantry, previously known as Company F, 22nd Virginia Infantry Regiment.

36th Virginia Infantry

The 36th Virginia Infantry was organized in the western counties of Virginia, now known as West Virginia. On May 13, 1861 this unit was known as the 2nd Kanawha Infantry Regiment, and on July 8, 1861 was accepted into Confederate State service. July 15, 1861 they were designated the 36th Virginia Infantry.

The regiments commanding officer was Colonel John McCausland. He led this regiment until May 19,1864 when he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General and transferred to the cavalry, which he commanded to the end of the war. From May 1864 to the end of the war this regiment was then commanded by Colonel William E. Fife.
Like almost all civil war regiments, the 36th Virginia Infantry was often known by alternate designations (such as those to the right) derived from the names of their commanding officers, such as Lt. Jackson Via. Unofficially these names were used to identify the regiment.

  •  Colonel McCausland’s Infantry
  •  Benjamin Linkous Infantry
  •  Colonel Smith’s Infantry
  •  Christopher Roles Infantry
  •  Colonel Fife’s Infantry
  •  Peter Morgan’s Infantry
  •  James McSherry’s Infantry
  •  Henry Grosscloss’s Infantry
  •  Francis Thornton’s Infantry
  •  Jackson Via’s Infantry

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